How To Be Antiracist & Other Must-Read/Watch/Listen Resources

As we learn to be better allies in the fight against racism, we put the call out to our Raddler community for resource recommendations. The following collective guide is the result. It is by no means is an exhaustive list. Thank you to all who contributed.


BOOKS

BOOK LISTS

CURRICULUM

2020 Curriculum Resources: Antiracist teaching materials for students


WHERE TO BUY BOOKS

PODCASTS
  • reply-all #127: The Crime Machine — New York City cops are in a fight against their own police department. They say it’s under the control of a broken computer system that punishes cops who refuse to engage in racist, corrupt policing. The story of their fight, and the story of the grouchy idealist who originally built the machine they’re fighting.
  • Making Sense #169: Omens of a Race War — Sam Harris speaks with Kathleen Belew about the white power movement in the United States.
  • Safe Space Radio: Talking to White Kids About Race & Racism — This hour-long program is about talking to white kids of all ages about race and racism: how white parents, families, and teachers can learn to show up for racial justice in a way that will make a difference for generations to come.

VIDEOS

ARTICLES & ESSAYS
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In an essay for the New York Times, acclaimed professor, award-winning author, and director of the Antiracist Research & Policy Center, @ibramxk dove into the topic of how to combat racism: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “No one becomes “not racist,” despite a tendency by Americans to identify themselves that way. We can only strive to be “anti-racist” on a daily basis, to continually rededicate ourselves to the lifelong task of overcoming our country’s racist heritage. We learn early the racist notion that white people have more because they are more; that people of color have less because they are less. I had internalized this worldview by my high school graduation, seeing myself and my race as less than other people and blaming other blacks for racial inequities. To build a nation of equal opportunity for everyone, we need to dismantle this spurious legacy of our common upbringing.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In order to do this, we have to educate ourselves. We can learn about covert white supremacy, follow organizations leading the way for racial equity and justice, watch films, listen to podcasts, and read books. This doesn’t need to be seen as a chore, but can instead be seen as an opportunity — an opportunity to better understand ourselves, love our neighbors, and become the change we wish to see. #AntiRacism #BecomeGoodNews ⠀⠀ — Link to resources in bio

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